The Rhubarb Patch

I love my rhubarb patch at this time of year, not just because it has begun to  flourish without too much attention but also because it has begun to provide me with tasty stalks at a time when little else is ready for picking on my allotment.   Its striking red stems and large glossy green leaves add a sculptural beauty to an otherwise sparse landscape on the allotment at this time of year.    As a hardy, frost resistant perennial, my rhubarb patch provides me with the first fruits of the allotment season. With only a yearly top dressing of compost, this versatile and textural plant  comes back stronger and stronger each year begging to be transformed into delicious; butters, chutneys, curds, cordials, gins, vinegars, cakes, puddings, breads, smoothies and pies.            

 

Rhubarb is an excellent alternative to the usual citrus fruit used to make curds. I love that I can   use eggs from my own coop to make the thick, creamy spread that is made by cooking together rhubarb juice, egg yolks, butter and sugar. The Fresh fruit juice and sugar provide the flavour of the curd, while the egg yolks serve to thicken up the mixture as it cooks. Most curd recipes also call for butter to be added to the finished curd, just to add a little extra richness and an extra-silky texture.  This rhubarb  curd is made the old-fashioned way, with butter, free-range eggs, rhubarb, orange and  lemon juice and a sprig or two of rosemary.  

Rhubarb is an excellent alternative to the usual citrus fruit used to make curds. I love that I can   use eggs from my own coop to make the thick, creamy spread that is made by cooking together rhubarb juice, egg yolks, butter and sugar. The Fresh fruit juice and sugar provide the flavour of the curd, while the egg yolks serve to thicken up the mixture as it cooks. Most curd recipes also call for butter to be added to the finished curd, just to add a little extra richness and an extra-silky texture.

This rhubarb  curd is made the old-fashioned way, with butter, free-range eggs, rhubarb, orange and  lemon juice and a sprig or two of rosemary.  

Book a workshop with me at The Yorkshire Preservatory to discover how you can make the most of the generous rhubarb plant.